Nebraska Campgrounds and RV Parks

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About Nebraska

Nebraska Campgrounds and RV Parks

The RV parks in Nebraska are spread throughout the state, and tend to cluster around the western and eastern borders. The western border with Wyoming and Colorado has hilly and mountainous topography, where the grassy plains run into pine forests; while the eastern edge of the state has dozens of RV resorts on either side of the Missouri River and Platte River. It’s here on the eastern end of the state where you’ll find most of Nebraska’s population, in cities like Omaha and Lincoln. The middle of Nebraska should not be ignored, however, as this area is rich with history and heritage, as the Pony Express, major railroads, and the trails left by covered wagons filled with settlers ran across these prairies in pursuit of the American dream. If you’re travelling along Interstate 80 you will pass the Pony Express Station and Museum, Sod House Museum, Golden Spike Tower, and Grain Bin Antique Town. The town of North Platte is home to the Buffalo Bill Ranch State Park which artfully combines antique western structures and attractions with the vibrant naturalism of the land it occupies. Head north from this area to visit Valentine National Wildlife Refuge and Samuel R. McKelvie National Forest which signify the geographical shift from the prairieland of the eastern half of Nebraska, to the piney hills of the western half.

The RV parks in western Nebraska are among the most popular in the state due to their ideal location between the Black Hills to the north and the Denver, Fort Collins, Cheyenne corridor along Interstate 25 to the southwest. The panhandle area itself has plenty to keep campers occupied and entertained all summer long. Between North Platte and Oglala National Grassland are dozens of natural destinations to explore. Check out Chimney Rock National Historic Site, Scotts Bluff National Monument, and Agate Fossil Beds National Monument, which are within 70 miles of each other.

Eastern Nebraska RV parks and campgrounds inhabit a much different kind of wilderness. This half of the state is farmland, prairies, and defined by the massive Platte and Missouri Rivers that have played such a pivotal role in American history. With such as the case, this land is ripe with important aspects of our national heritage. The city of Omaha has experienced an economic boom in the past few years, and is alive with fine dining, public arts, a zoo, and all of the typical amenities of a major American city combined with the unique local elements of the area’s residents, both past and present. The Platte River is straddled by numerous state parks and recreation areas ideal for day and weekend jaunts to the countryside, and the city of Omaha is a reasonable drive from other major metros like Des Moines, Sioux City, and Kansas City.